A stack of books I read in February.

Quarterly Wrap-Up of 2018 #1

When I first started this post, I had imagined that doing a quarterly wrap-up would be ideal, since I don’t read a lot of books in a month. Therefore, out of fear that one of my monthly wrap-ups would consist of me writing about this one book I started, but didn’t really finish – I decided to do quaterly wrap-ups. This would allow me to share more experiences with you in one post.

However, I had not expected to read as much as I did. January was filled with six books, and I figured it was because I took my exam and then was left with almost two weeks before I started school and work again. But the streak continued into February, and then I just decided to do one quarterly wrap-up, but the rest of the year I will do monthly wrap-ups. I’d rather write a short post about this one book I didn’t really finish, than a loooooong post about all of these books I read, knowing that most of you will give up by the time you see the lenght of it, and the rest of you will give up after the first few paragraphs.

Wrap-up

I will briefly list the books I have read in the same order that I read them, and afterwards I will talk about a few of them and a bit about my reading motivation in this same period of time. Please note that some of the titles are in Danish (and consists of the odd letters æ ø å) because I read them in Danish! If the book has an official English title (and I know it) it will follow in parenthesis ().

January reads

  • Ligblomsten by Anne Mette Hancock
  • Stalker by Michella Rasmussen
  • Pigen fra Månehøjen by Lene Krog
  • Grænsebørn by Bent Haller
  • Nattevagt (Night Guard) by Synne Lea and Stian Hole
  • Er du okay, Fie by Anika Eibe

February reads

  • Krokodillevogteren by Katrine Engberg
  • A Wild and Unremarkable Thing by Jen Castleberry
  • Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
  • Begin Again by Mona Kasten
  • Kåde Kvinder by Giovanna Casotto
  • Voksenlivet er en myte (Adulthood is a Myth) by Sarah’s Scribbles

March Reads

  • Wildwood by Jadie Jones
  • Farlige Fristelser by Giovanna Casotto
  • Den sidste gode mand by A.J. Kazinski
  • Søvn og torne (The Sleeper and the Spindle) by Neil Gaiman
  • Fordærv (The Few) by Nadia Dalbuono
  • Provinspis by Ditte Wiese
  • Pernittengryn og Lorelei by Helle Melander
  • Sjælens pris – Dæmonherskerens arving #3 by Haidi Wigger Klaris
  • Song of Blood and Stone by L. Penelope
  • Suddenly Us by Marie Skye

Succinct Wrap-Up

I read a total of 22 books in these three months, which is almost my reading goal for 2016. That is quite amazing and frankly also quite unfathomable. But I have never felt forced to read this many books, it has almost come naturally, because I had a lot of books I wanted to read.

Seven of these books have been review copies from either an author or a publishing house, and I feel honoured to have had the chance to review these books. Except for one, I really loved reading all of them. And the one I didn’t enjoy as much, was mainly because it just wasn’t my kind of read anyway. It really wasn’t a bad book.

 

honourable Mentions

Stalker

by Michella Rasmussen is a Danish YA book about a young girl who suddenly has an admirer, that slowly turns stalker. It is amazingly well written and deals with an issue I haven’t read about before. It takes both the stalker’s and the victim’s point of view, which I think is absolutely fantastic and it works terrificly in this book. The audioversion of it is amazing too!

Krokodillevogteren

by Katrine Engberg is a Danish crime novel that has been translated into several languages (I do not think English is one yet, though – unfortunately). It is about a murder on a young girl that has been committed in the most gruesome way. The characters in this novel were brilliant and I fell in love with them as much as I loved the story itself.

A Wild and Unremarkable Thing

by Jen Castleberry is a fantasy story with a twist of a feminstic approach. It tells the story about a young girl, who has been raised as a boy in order to be able to slay a Fire Scale dragon and collect the winnings afterwards, so that she can save her family from poverty. It is brilliantly crafted and I really wish it would be longer, since I really connected with the main character Cayda.

Provinspis

by Ditte Wiese is a realistic YA novel, which has quickly climbed up to be one of my most valued reads. Again, this is Danish, and hasn’t been translated yet, but I think it should! The narration and the voice of the story is spot on with the youth and Ditte tells a tough story about growing up and wanting to get away. If you read Danish and love a good YA-novel, you should read this one! And please let me know what you think afterwards as I would love to discuss it.

Ligblomsten

by Anne Mette Hancock is again a Danish crime novel, but this one is a bit different from most othe crime novels I have read. Ligblomsten (Corpse Flower) deals with the notion of revenge and I don’t really think anyone is actually killed on the pages, which makes it even more interesting.

Song of Blood and Stone

by L. Penelope is a fantasy novel set in a magical land, and th characters are so compelling. I loved everything about this book and I cannot wait to share this with you, when I post a full review of it on Sunday, April 29. It is amazing and if you love fantasy you should read it. End of story.

Reading motivation

I have been on a roll reading wise. I have no idea how it happened that I already read 22 books, but I have in no way felt pressured to. I have just read. And listened at any available time. I did cut down a little on reading for school, but only because I am only following one course this term. And I have also cut down a little on my work hours since I have been dealing with some personal issues that demanded I took some time to myself.

in the future

As mentioned earlier in this post, I will post a monthly wrap-up in the future as this was far too comprehensive a post for my own liking.

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